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Long Paddock laws fairer on councils

News Release

Friday, 4 November 2016

Long Paddock laws fairer on councils

Queensland councils will have more control of the state’s 2.6 million-hectare stock route network – and the revenues generated from grazier fees – under Long Paddock legislation introduced in Parliament this week.

The Local Government Association of Queensland welcomed the Stock Route Network Management Bill 2016, saying it vital to preserving the historic network and easing the financial burden on councils.

LGAQ CEO Greg Hallam said councils had been lobbying for legislative reform since 2002, arguing for fairer financing arrangements in the maintenance and administration of stock routes.

Under the proposed changes, grazing permit fees will be paid to councils, not the State Government.

Councils will use the revenue to manage the routes and fund programs for pest and weed control, environmental protection, cultural preservation and fire risk management.

“At the moment, the management of the network is 96 per cent subsidised by ratepayers and not the major beneficiaries of its use,” he said.

“This Bill will allow local governments to keep all revenue from fees, an important step toward the sustainable management of this important resource.

"It's been 14 years in the making. It's been the subject of innumerable reviews and has lapsed at least once and has endured two changes of government. Needless to say, tit's long overdue."

Queensland’s stock route network spans 2.6 million hectares and has been a vital resource for pastoralists for the past 150 years.

Local Government Association of Queensland
LG House, 25 Evelyn Street, Newstead Qld 4006


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