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 Local Government Elections

Local Communities Decide - Elections 2012

The Electoral Commission of Queensland conducted the 2012 Local Government Elections, as prescribed by the Local Government Electoral Act 2011, which more closely aligns council electoral arrangements with those applying at State Government elections in Queensland.  As a result of the subsequent higher financial cost, pressure remains within local government for councils to return to the option of contracting other parties (including ECQ) to conduct their elections or to do so themselves, as was the case prior to the 2008 Local Government Elections. 

Another unusual feature of the 2012 elections that the 2008-2012 term was extended by one month beyond the normal four year fixed term, to allow for the State election that was held on 24 March 2012. There also continued to be a high turnover of experienced mayors and councillors, exacerbated by the end of the first term after a difficult four year term following the forced 2008 council amalgamations, with a record number of sitting mayors defeated, new mayors with no previous local government experience and new elected councillors.

For more detail see

Pre-election resources

  • Everyone Has A Say - Make your say count on the day
  • Visit the Electoral Commission of Queensland website to view the election timetable and further information for electors, candidates, political parties, media, employment, legislation and Q&A.
  • LGAQ thanks Scenic Rim Regional Council for their permission to link to this handy Governance resource - prepared by Scenic Rim Regional Council  to assist their staff and councillors understand caretaker period operation of Council. Caretaker Period Protocol (2012)
  • LGAQ thanks Toowoomba Regional Council for their permission to link to this handy Governance resource - prepared by Toowoomba Regional Council  to assist local government staff interested in standing as candidates in LG Elections.  Fact Sheet - Employees seeking to stand for Election to Council 

Local Communities Decide - Elections 2008

As a result of the State Government's Local Government Reform there were 73 councils in Queensland local government for the 2008 elections - 37 continuing councils (unchanged in terms of area) and 36 new councils (changed in area by amalgamation or boundary change).

Another unusual feature of the 2008 local government elections was that for the first time, no council conducted their own elections. The Local Government Reform legislation prescribed that the Electoral Commission of Queensland (ECQ) conduct all elections, whereas up to 2004, only Brisbane City Council elections had been conducted by ECQ.

LGAQ has compiled some facts, figures and analysis of the Queensland Local Government Elections held on Saturday 15 March 2008. 

Local Communities Decide - Elections 2004

(The information on this page was compiled following the declaration of all elections across the State, except Dalrymple Shire Division 2, where the death of a candidate on the eve of the election required that the election be recommenced.)

Two councils did not need to hold an election: Bendemere had the exact number of nominations for the number of positions of mayor and councillors; and Tambo had fewer nominations than required for the positions of councillor and the mayor had been returned unopposed.  One council (Wondai) had fewer nominations than required for councillors with eight nominations for nine positions.

LGAQ has compiled some facts, figures and analysis of the Queensland Local Government Elections held on Saturday 27 March 2004.  

 

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