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Wild weather across Queensland : Video update with LGAQ CEO Greg Hallam

Wednesday, 14 March 2018

Update (Wednesday, April 4 2018):

The Minister for Fire and Emergency Services has approved the extension of the jointly funded Commonwealth/State Natural Disaster Relief and Recovery Arrangements (NDRRA) in relation to Severe Tropical Cyclone Nora and Associated Flooding, 24 – 29 March 2018.

The date range and area defined for receipt of the NDRRA relief measures is:  “Communities within Cape York affected by Severe Tropical Cyclone Nora and associated heavy rainfall and flooding, 24 – 29 March 2018”.

The Minister has approved the relief measures listed below:

Counter Disaster Operations for the local government areas:

  • Cairns Regional Council
  • Carpentaria Shire Council
  • Cook Shire Council
  • Croydon Shire Council
  • Douglas Shire Council
  • Etheridge Shire Council
  • Hinchinbrook Shire Council

Restoration of Essential Public Assets for the local government areas:

  • Cairns Regional Council
  • Carpentaria Shire Council
  • Cook Shire Council
  • Croydon Shire Council
  • Douglas Shire Council
  • Etheridge Shire Council

 

March 12, 2018

It’s been a wild week of weather across Queensland with a tropical low in the Coral Sea continuing to move towards Queensland's south-east.  The system, which is currently sitting around the Solomon Islands, has left a trail of damage in North Queensland amounting to millions of dollars and weeks of repairs.  

See LGAQ CEO Greg Hallam povide an overview of what's been happening accross the state in the video below:

How many council were impacted?

  • About a third of all the state's local government areas have been affected as a direct result of the weather system and subsequent flooding.

Where are they at now with recovery?

  • 30 councils have requested activation for counter disaster operations and/or restoration of essential public assets.

Why is there a weather event now?

Queensland and the tropical pacific region are now in La Nina - part of a natural cycle known as the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The ENSO cycle loosely operates over timescales from one to eight years.

La Niña occurs when equatorial trade winds become stronger, changing ocean surface currents and drawing cooler deep water up from below. This results in a cooling of the central and eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. The enhanced trade winds also help to pile up warm surface waters in the western Pacific and to the north of Australia.

La Niña typically means:

  • Increased rainfall
  • Cooler maximum temperatures
  • Shift in temperature extremes
  • Greater tropical cyclone numbers
  • Earlier monsoon onset

More information:

 

 

Local Government Association of Queensland
LG House, 25 Evelyn Street, Newstead Qld 4006